I always feel bad about not updating here, but I never have much to say. Or, perhaps equivalently, I have too much to say. The nature of Pola, the polynomial-time programming language I’m working on, is constantly changing and I wouldn’t really want to explain all the details here anyway. Suffice it to say that the spirit of the language remains essentially the same and the details of the language change day-to-day, a slight exaggeration.

I’m newly committed to better balancing my research and my teaching. Teaching had taken over my time completely this term and research had fallen by the way-side, which is really a shame. I’ve changed that this week, though, and have got a lot of good work done.

I gave a short talk about my research at the Western Research Forum, an annual mini-conference here at UWO for graduate students of all disciplines. I’m pleased to announce that I won second place for the natural sciences session. First place went to someone dealing with meteorites: it was also my choice for first place, so I have no problems losing to that. After my presentation I got a lot of good question which, if nothing else, shows I could keep people’s interest. The questions didn’t come exclusively from computer scientists, either, but from other physical scientists curious about how this might relate to all the FORTRAN code they have to work through. It was good to see.

The highlight of the conference was seeing Jorge Cham, author of Piled Higher and Deeper. I very highly recommend going to see him talk if you get the chance. It’s a funny talk, of course, but carries a lot of insight with it, too. I’ve uploaded one picture from the talk which made a big impression on me.

Talking with people about my research, I always go back and forth between my motivations and where I want to focus my research. When talking with people in theory or in programming languages, they seem to be most interested in proving theoretical properties of the language and making sure that’s all very solid. When talking with everyone else, the prevailing opinion is “yes, but no one would ever use it”, reinforcing that the “face” of the language, the syntax and the typing system, is most important. I need to get a good balance between the two.

Advertisements